Io passing in front of  Jupiter. (Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, Cassini Project, NASA)

Io passing in front of Jupiter. (Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, Cassini Project, NASA)

In the Science 360 program “Bring the Universe to Light,” MPSC educators tell the story of Galileo Galilei’s surprising observations of the planet Jupiter.

With a telescope or even just a decent pair of binoculars, you can discover what Galileo did 400 years ago: Jupiter has moons that orbit it. This observation contradicted a commonly held view that everything revolved around Earth.

Tonight, something special happens with these dancing points of light that Galileo observed. Two moons, Ganymede and Europa, will appear to cast dark shadows on Jupiter as they pass in front of the planet. And Io will disappear as it passes behind.

The Chapel Hill Astronomical and Observational Society invites the public to join them for an informal telescope viewing of this moon dance after 9 p.m. tonight, Wednesday, Aug. 26, at Farrington Point, Jordan Lake. (Please note this is not the same place where the regular Morehead skywatching sessions meet.)

Amy Sayle is Morehead's Science 360 manager.



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