Home » Online » On Your Screen » Blog

Blog

LEGOs headed to Jupiter

Jun 22 2016 - 10:47am

BY AMY SAYLE

UPDATE: On October 26 at 6:00 p.m. NASA JPL Solar System  Ambassador Jeff Qualls will be on site to bring us new high-resolution photos of Jupiter  and discuss the early results of the Juno Mission.  Don't miss this event on Wednesday Oct. 26 6:00 p.m. at the GSK Fulldome Theater.

 

Jupiter is about to receive a visitor. After a five-year and 400-million-mile journey, NASA’s Juno spacecraft will reach the planet on July 4, 2016.

Mercury's time in the Sun: Transit of Mercury, May 9, 2016

May 5 2016 - 3:27pm

BY AMY SAYLE

Join us at the Morehead Sundial on Monday, May 9, 2016 to see something no one has seen in nearly a decade: a transit of Mercury.

On May 9, Mercury will pass directly between Earth and the Sun and will look like a tiny dark spot crossing the Sun from 7:12 a.m. to 2:42 p.m. Eastern time.

We’re throwing the biggest star party in the universe, and you’re invited

Apr 6 2016 - 9:33am

BY AMY SAYLE​

North Carolina hosts the biggest star party in the universe (at least we think it’s the biggest) – and you’re invited!

The 4th annual NC Statewide Star Party happens April 8 and 9, 2016, as a kickoff to the two-week-long NC Science Festival. More than 50 sites across the state, from the mountains to the coast, will offer skywatching events for the public on April 8 or 9.

7 things to find in the evening sky this March

Mar 23 2016 - 1:16pm
BY AMY SAYLE

Image: ​​If the Moon is up, it’ll be the easiest thing to spot in the sky. Credit: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio

Here are 7 celestial wonders to try finding in the current evening sky (late March 2016):

Six onion-eating wives: a love story in the sky

Feb 10 2016 - 1:25pm

BY AMY SAYLE

In time for Valentine’s Day, a poignant Monache love story can be witnessed high in the early evening sky. The main characters are represented by the Hyades and Pleiades, two star clusters in the constellation Taurus.

In the story, six young women (the Pleiades) were married to six young men (the Hyades). Every day, the men would hunt mountain lions, and the women would gather plants. One day, the women discovered a new plant: wild onions.

5-planet party in the predawn sky

Jan 26 2016 - 5:10pm

BY AMY SAYLE

Those of you who come to our skywatching sessions know that although we always find interesting things to look at, the evening planet situation has been positively pathetic lately.

That’s because the planet action is currently best in the early morning sky -- you can see 5 planets at once. Read on for viewing tips:

Which 5 planets can I see?

Tips for viewing the 2015 Geminids

Dec 10 2015 - 4:18pm
Image: Geminid meteors appear to originate from the constellation Gemini, from a point near the bright star Castor.

BY AMY SAYLE

7 things to know about viewing the 2015 Geminids:

1. This is a strong, reliable meteor shower.

Four Ways To Find The North Star (And One Way Not To)

Nov 30 2015 - 4:52pm
Caption: You can use the Big Dipper, Little Dipper, or Cassiopeia to help you find the North Star.

BY: AMY SAYLE

“How can you find north?” I once asked a planetarium audience. A young voice replied, “Just look for the red letter N!”

That, of course, was an excellent suggestion for inside the planetarium. There, helpful red letters on the horizon mark the cardinal directions.

But what do you do outside?

The early bird gets the planets this fall

Oct 28 2015 - 7:56am

By Amy Sayle

For you early birds, the current planet viewing situation is fabulous. Step out on the next clear morning before sunrise (you’re already up anyway, right?) to see Jupiter, Venus, Mars, and Mercury.

Image: Venus and Mars appear close together in the pre-dawn eastern sky on November 3, 2015 (Credit: Stellarium).

Q&A about viewing the total lunar eclipse on Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015

Sep 23 2015 - 10:20am

BY AMY SAYLE

This coming Sunday, September 27, 2015, the full moon will move into Earth’s shadow, creating a lunar eclipse. The eclipsed Moon should be a beautiful shade of deep red or orange.

As long as the weather cooperates, this is an especially nice eclipse for those of us in the eastern United States. We get to see every stage of the eclipse, the Moon will be well positioned fairly high in the sky, and most of the action happens before midnight.

Pages