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Mark your calendar for August 21, 2017, for ‘the most exciting thing people can see’

Aug 20 2015 - 9:15am

In 2017, the continental United States will get its first total solar eclipse in 38 years

BY AMY SAYLE

Image on right: Total solar eclipse in 2010, Easter Island. (Credit: Jay Pasachoff, Muzhou Lu, Craig Malamut, Hana Druckmüllerová)

Blog Post

Tips for viewing the 2015 Perseid meteor shower

Aug 7 2015 - 5:17pm

BY AMY SAYLE

As long as the weather cooperates, this is a particularly good year for the Perseid meteors. This annual meteor shower is already happening and is predicted to peak the night of August 12-13, 2015 (Wednesday evening into Thursday pre-dawn).

Blog Post

How to Treat Post-Pluto Depression

Jul 22 2015 - 12:53pm

BY AMY SAYLE

Nothing existed for me last week except Pluto.

News Release

Pluto & New Horizons: A Special Presentation

Jul 7 2015 - 9:09am

Morehead welcomes Tony Rice, NASA Solar System Ambassador, on Friday, July 17, for a free presentation about NASA's New Horizons mission and the data it is collecting about dwarf planet Pluto. The presentation begins at 7:30 p.m. in the GSK Fulldome Theater. Come learn about New Horizons and its technology!

Read Tony Rice's blog post, After 9 years, New Horizons reaches Pluto’s doorstep, on Morehead's blog.

Blog Post

After 9 years, New Horizons reaches Pluto’s doorstep

Jul 6 2015 - 9:26am
Image: New Horizons mission design - Yanping Guo, Robert W. Farquhar

BY TONY RICE

After 9 years in flight the New Horizons mission is on Pluto’s doorstep. That journey was made possible in part by a gravity assist from massive Jupiter in 2007 which accelerated the baby-grand-piano-sized spacecraft to a speed of over 83,600 km/h (52,000 mph) away from the Sun, New Horizons will fly by Pluto and its system of five known moons on July 14, 2015, returning science to help unlock the secrets of the outer solar system.

Blog Post

Cover Venus and Jupiter with your pinky on June 30, 2015

Jun 26 2015 - 3:22pm

BY AMY SAYLE

If you've paid attention to the evening sky recently, you know that the two brightest planets, Venus and Jupiter, appear to be pulling closer together each night.

Venus is that object shining very, very brightly in the west soon after sunset. Jupiter is the less bright (but still bright) object currently positioned just to the upper left of Venus.

News Release

It's the summer of Pluto at Morehead!

Jun 9 2015 - 12:31pm

Curious about Pluto? Everyone know its story - formerly recognized as the smallest planet of nine in our Solar System and now reclassified as a dwarf planet. With the New Horizons mission collecting fresh data about Pluto, there's more to learn. This summer, Morehead offers new opportunities to learn about Pluto. And these programs are free!

News Release

Research Slam! at Morehead's Science Stage July 11, 2015

Jun 2 2015 - 11:15am

Join student researchers from UNC's computational astronomy and physics summer program for "Research Slam!" on July 11, 2015 (2:30-3:30 p.m.), on Morehead's Science Stage. This program features a series of three-minute teaser presentations by student researchers featuring their current work, plus fun interactive activities to help you discover your inner computer researcher!

Blog Post

See four evening planets: Mercury, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn

May 11 2015 - 11:43am

BY AMY SAYLE

Have you seen the four planets that currently decorate the evening sky? From west to east, they are Mercury, Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn.*

The easiest of the four to spot is Venus – because it is so, so bright. Look in the western sky soon after sunset. You can easily pick it out in the twilight, before you notice stars becoming visible and well before the sky becomes completely dark.

News Release

Carolina Biological and The North Carolina Science Festival support the 3rd annual Carolina STEM Challenge Competition

Apr 30 2015 - 3:51pm
Carolina Biological Supply Company, in partnership with the North Carolina Science Festival, is pleased to announce the results of the 3rd annual Carolina STEM Challenge Competition. The winners of the 2015 competition were selected from more than 100 classrooms in 86 cities across North Carolina. “Since the start of the competition in 2012, we have continued to be amazed by the dedication, hard-work, and ingenuity of North Carolina teachers and students.

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