This is a liveblog that I wrote during a free public lecture by Dr. Anthony Aveni on Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2010, at Morehead Planetarium and Science Center in Chapel Hill. Dr. Aveni’s lecture explored scientific research countering predictions that the world will end in December 2012. These predictions are based in part on the fact that the Maya calendar ends in December 2012.

Dr. Aveni is known worldwide as an expert on Maya culture and beliefs and has appeared on the Discovery Channel, NPR, PBS-Nova, the Today Show and other national media outlets to discuss Maya astronomy. Since 1963, he has taught at Colgate University, where he is the Russell B. Colgate Professor of Astronomy and Anthropology, serving dual appointments. He is considered by his peers to be a founder of the field of Mesoamerican archaeoastronomy and has written 13 books on Maya beliefs.

6:51 p.m.
With just a few minutes before the program begins, there are plenty of seats available in the room. Wonder what kind of crowd Aveni will draw. I’d expect a lot. The mythology about 2012 and its end-of-the-world prophecies is a popular theme with Morehead audiences. This is a younger crowd than I expected — 20s, 30s. Interesting that most people are sitting near the front, eager to hear every word.

6:53 p.m.
I see some backpacks. That’s usually a clue that professors have offered extra credit for students who attend the lecture. And this would be a good opportunity; Aveni has world-class credentials in astronomy, anthropology and maybe in archaeology, too. And he’s supposed to be entertaining: “Rolling Stone” magazine named him one of its “Top Ten College Professors.” Sure, that was nearly 20 years ago, but I still think he’ll be engaging.

6:54 p.m.
Suspicion confirmed. A young woman in the row ahead of me is talking to her friend about how many people from her class showed up.

6:59 p.m.
Here come the dignitaries, right on schedule. I see Aveni and his wife, along with Morehead’s director, Dr. Todd Boyette. There’s Dr. Vin Steponaitis, who heads UNC’s Research Laboratories of Archeology. Who else? Some reps from Lenovo, which is sponsoring Aveni’s lectures here and earlier this week at Appalachian State University.

7 p.m.
PowerPoint clicks on. Audience quiets.

7:02 p.m.
“Good evening. Welcome to Morehead ….” Boyette begins the introductions. About three-quarters of the seats are filled, and a few latecomers are streaming in.

7:05 p.m.
Aveni hits the stage and introduces a few friends, then launches headlong into his lecture. Energetic, upbeat, tossing darts and digs at his target (which, apparently, is anyone who buys into the 2012 mythology). Wonder how the audience will respond to that — are these people among the conspiracy-theory faithful?

7:06 p.m.
First, the basics. The “Long Count” of the Maya cycle ends on solstice, Dec. 21, 2012. Aveni describes it as a car odometer: The world doesn’t end, but the count rolls over into a new cycle. Some rustling in the crowd, some physical expressions of disbelief.

7:08 p.m.
Aveni puts a Lee Lorenz cartoon from the “New Yorker” on the screen: Two gloomy businessmen are walking down the street. One consoles the other, “It’s not the end of the world.” Around the corner, not yet in their line of vision, the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse ride toward them. “It’s not the end of the world,” Aveni reassures us. This guy has an audacious, boisterous sense of humor.

7:11 p.m.
So what can we expect to happen in 2012? Aveni presents two schools of thought: “Blow Up” or “Bliss Out.” The world explodes, or we melt into a new age of euphoria. Either way, there’s change. But is it really going to happen?

7:14 p.m.
Here’s the astronomy part. “A solar flare releases more energy than all the nuclear power plants on Earth.” Hmmm. Yeah, that could be a blow-up.

7:18 p.m.
Aveni is skewering what he calls “2012 Gurus.” He cites their claims, incredulous: Don’t worry about retirement. Cleanse your colon to receive energy! Earth has acupuncture points, and one of them is Pike’s Peak. This must be the bliss-out part.

7:20 p.m.
Finally, on to the reality. Aveni shows photos of the Maya pyramids, tells us that the Maya were a sophisticated culture, comparable to the Greeks and the Romans in their achievements.

7:23 p.m.
Aveni emphasizes that many Maya books were burned by Christian explorers, intent on eradicating any evidence of what they considered pagan knowledge. Only a few writings remain of hundreds, maybe thousands that once existed. Today, we think of this ancient culture as revolving around astronomy and religious practices, but perhaps it appears that way only because the Maya writings we have found are about those topics.

7:25 p.m.
Now he’s describing one of the rituals depicting in the writings. It’s unpleasant. There’s blood involved.

7:26 p.m.
This is interesting. The words Aveni uses from the ritual don’t sound like anything from Latin America. They’re very harsh, gutteral. I assumed the Maya language would resemble Spanish, but of course it doesn’t. The Maya were present long before Spanish explorers appeared.

7:27 p.m.
Back to astronomy, plus religion and some mathematics. Maya writings establish the “Hearth of Creation” as a core belief (with a symbolic representation in every Maya home). This three-stone hearth, built by Maya gods, is reflected in the constellation Orion. Aveni tells us that the Maya gods descended to Earth frequently and interacted with Maya people often, according to the writings.

He outlines the time passages as marked by the Maya — too fast for me to keep up, but I do understand now that the Maya calendar is based on the number 20. (Aveni says it’s because the Maya counted on their fingers and toes but we only count on our fingers, since we typically wear shoes — what a jokester.) Each Maya month has 20 days, so there are 18 months in a Maya year.

7:31 p.m.
All of the known Maya writings (Aveni calls them “codices”) refer to rituals that must be performed to keep the world in balance. (This reminds me of the Balinese rituals that Elizabeth Gilbert outlined in “Eat Pray Love.”)

There are flood myths in Maya codices, he adds. “What culture doesn’t have a flood myth? You know about this from two weeks ago, when they got 22 inches of rain in Wilmington! Want to know more about floods? Go to the Ninth Ward [New Orleans].”

7:35 p.m.
Aveni’s on a rampage now, ripping through 2012 predictions one by one:

“Maya literature is either historical or ritual. It’s not prophetic. So where does this mythology come from?

“Planets go in and out of alignment. Go to the NASA website. You can see the planetary alignments in 10 seconds. I looked it up myself.”

“Gravitational pull and tides? The Moon’s pull creates a two-foot tide. The Sun’s pull, a one-foot tide. The next most powerful gravitational pull on Earth comes from Venus, and that’s only one five-hundredth of an inch.”

BOOM! He shot those down. There’s even an animation that shows the galactic convergence.

7:40 p.m.
People in China don’t care about this, Aveni says. You won’t find a culture of apocalyptic thinking in Russia or Africa. Americans are the only people in the world who believe this stuff (yes, “stuff” is Aveni’s word).

This predisposition toward apocalyptic belief began with the Pilgrims, continued with the Millerites in the mid-1800s and is strong today. Aveni cites 13 “end of the world” predictions for the year 2006 alone, including one earthquake, one comet collision, one planetary alignment and two nuclear winters, among other calamities.

The book “Hamlet’s Mill” suggests that major world events happen every time the Sun moves in position from one constellation to another constellation. And apparently Americans aren’t alone in their interest in destruction; Isaac Newton predicted the world would end in 2065.

There’s a flurry of PowerPoint slides reflecting different apocalyptic messages. Aveni mentions the “Heaven’s Gate” cult, too, known for a mass suicide in 1997. These people believed that Earth was due to be “recycled” and that they would be transported to a spaceship to travel to another dimension. [Apparently they left some of their cult members behind, though, because someone is still running their website.] Only in America ….

7:51 p.m.
Sacred tourism! That’s one reason that the Maya mythology remains, Aveni says. “Here’s Chichen Itza. If you’re there at sunset on the equinox, the snake will descend. Thousands of people come to see it. Why would you want to be there?”

7:55 p.m.
Lawrence Joseph again. This is the fifth or sixth time Aveni has mentioned Lawrence Joseph, who has written books about a 2012 apocalypse — he really loathes this guy. “People believe that science conspires against giving correct information.” As a scientist, Aveni’s not happy about that.

7:58 p.m.
Another quick look at the “bliss out” option. People expect “joy despite disaster” in fin de siecle (end of century) times.

8:02 p.m.
Aveni begins his close with a visual joke, an “Alien Time Line” (originally published in 1997 by “Skeptical Inquirer” magazine) that depicts the evolution of alien races as seen by the American moviegoer.

“We tend to put our hope in others to save us, to give us knowledge — Egyptians! Mayans! Aliens! Maybe the answers are not out there but in here.”

8:04 p.m.
Ask a Maya shaman, “What happens in 2012?” The answer: “We start another cycle.”

8:05 p.m.
Applause, polite, muted with a few pockets of enthusiasm. The students here for extra credit begin their exodus. Questions, fewer than I expected.

What about polar shifts?
“They happen. Our magnetic north is constantly on the move, in fact. But this doesn’t happen all at once — it’s a process that takes hundreds of years to complete, and it’s not going to happen in 2012.”

What about alien visits?
“That relies on some big Western assumptions: that [aliens] can communicate, that they want to visit us, that they want to give us knowledge.”

What about Fibonacci numbers?
“The spirals predict the growth of a shell, of a pine cone. But they aren’t predicting an apocalypse.”

Why do so many people believe in these Maya prophecies?
“American religion’s appetite for apocalypse comes to the forefront during times of fear. And we’re at war, there’s terrorism, there’s the economy — these are fearful times.”

8:10 p.m.
Boyette approaches the lectern, thanks the audience and Aveni. A few crowd around Aveni with more questions before the evening (but not the world) ends.

Morehead is planning a special "Carolina Skies: End of the World edition" for December 21, 2012.

Skywatching at Jordan Lake

Join us for a skywatching session at Jordan Lake!

What happens at Morehead’s skywatching sessions at Jordan Lake?

A lot of fun! You get to enjoy being outside at night, meet nice folks, and look through telescopes brought by Morehead Planetarium and Science Center and members of the Chapel Hill Astronomical and Observational Society (CHAOS). Raleigh Astronomy Club (RAC) members often bring telescopes as well. If skies permit, a Morehead educator will give a constellation tour with a green laser—tours are announced during the session.

Where and when are the skywatching sessions?

Morehead hosts free skywatching sessions for the public nearly every month (weather permitting) at Ebenezer Church Recreation Area at Jordan Lake. The Jordan Lake sessions are usually on a Saturday evening, but may occur on a weekday if there is a special sky event, such as a meteor shower.

Occasionally, skywatching sessions are held at other sites, including Little River Regional Park. Check Morehead’s online skywatching calendar for the current schedule and directions.

What will I see at a skywatching session?

It depends on what’s in the sky that night. Typically, we schedule sessions so you can see the Moon. Usually at least one planet is visible. Expect to also see some objects outside our solar system, such as double stars, star clusters, nebulae, or even other galaxies. You might also see satellites and meteors.

If you’ve been to one skywatching session, you definitely haven’t been to them all! The stars and constellations change over the year as Earth orbits the Sun, and the Moon and planets move from night to night against the background of the stars.

Will I see the Milky Way?

Maybe. Jordan Lake offers better (darker) skies than many places in the Triangle, but the sky is still light polluted. Even so, we often see the Milky Way—the hazy band that’s the plane of our galaxy.

Do I have to make a reservation?

No, just show up. If you plan to bring a large group, such as an entire class or Scouts group, we’d appreciate a heads-up at (919) 962-1236, but it’s not required.

Is there a fee?

No, Morehead’s public skywatching sessions are free.

What if it’s cloudy? How do I know if the skywatching session is cancelled?

The telescopes can’t see through clouds, so don’t come if skies are overcast or it’s raining. We recommend checking Morehead’s website after 5 p.m. the day of the session, just to make sure there’s not a cancelation notice. We also often post updates on Facebook and Twitter.

Where do I park for the Jordan Lake sessions?

There’s plenty of parking at Ebenezer Church Recreation Area. If you arrive later in the session, try to park at the nearer end of the lot, so that your headlights stay away from the telescopes. Please turn headlights off as soon as your car is safely parked.

What should I wear?

Bring layers. Unless it’s the warmest of summer nights, standing around outside at night can feel colder than you’d expect. Dress more warmly than you think you need to, and it’ll probably work out just right.

What about flashlights?

Regular white flashlights are fine to use in emergencies, and inside the restroom building. Otherwise, please use only red light, or even better, no light at all. Your eyes will take a number of minutes to fully adapt to the dark, but once they do, you’ll be amazed at how well you can see! Using white light—including light from cellphones or flash photos—will instantly ruin your night vision, as well as that of everyone around you, and will probably make the astronomers grumpy.

Are there restrooms?

Ebenezer Church Recreation Area at Jordan Lake has restrooms with flush toilets. The restrooms will not be lit, so this is where you’ll want your flashlight!

Is my pet welcome?

No pets, please. Pets (even on a leash) + lots of people + expensive telescopes + the dark = a bad combination.

Do I have to stay the whole time?

No, you can drop in any time. But what’s up in the sky will change during the session because of Earth’s rotation. If you arrive late, you might miss out on objects setting in the west. If you leave early, you might miss out on objects rising in the east. Those not staying the whole time may also miss out on a constellation tour.

Can I arrive before the scheduled start time? Can I stay after it ends?

If you arrive early, you may find that telescope operators are too busy setting up to have a conversation. The Jordan Lake rangers request that we pack up and exit at the scheduled end time.

Are skywatching sessions kid-friendly?

Yes! All ages are welcome. Very young children may not get much out of looking through a telescope, but those elementary-school-aged and older may especially enjoy the experience. Parents: We recommend you look through the telescope first—then you’ll be better able to help your child look.

Sometimes, children (as well as adults) want to grab hold of the telescope, potentially smudging the eyepiece or knocking the object out of view. Please teach children not to touch the telescope without the operator’s permission. You can ask children to place their hands behind their back as they approach the scope. Explain they’ll be using their eyes to look, not their hands.

How do I look through a telescope?

First, find the end of the line for a given telescope. When you get to the front, be sure not to grab on to the telescope or you may knock things out of alignment. Ask the telescope operator if you’re not sure where to put your eye. You may need to try moving your eye closer or farther from the eyepiece to get a good view. If you wear glasses, try looking with them first; if the image seems blurry, ask the operator for help.

Don’t see anything? Speak up! The operator may need to adjust the scope. Have questions after you look? The telescope operators would love to answer them! Please step aside to ask, so the line can keep moving.

Do I have to bring a telescope?

No. Morehead and local astronomy club members provide the telescopes. All you have to do is show up. You may look through any of the telescopes.

But what if I do bring my own telescope?

Please know that Morehead skywatching sessions are not “star parties” aimed at fellow amateur astronomers. Rather, they are public outreach sessions, and the public will be expecting to look through your telescope. Typically, up to 200 or more people attend our skywatching sessions at Jordan Lake.

If you would enjoy providing views to the public through your telescope, we suggest you join CHAOS or RAC (astronomy clubs), where you will meet a supportive community and receive updates about public and private observing sessions.

Are skywatching sessions a good place for me to learn to use my telescope?

Probably not. Daytime is a better time to get familiar with your telescope (of course, don’t point it at the Sun unless it’s equipped with a proper solar filter). And if you bring your scope to a Jordan Lake session, people will come up to you the entire time wanting to look through it.

The sessions can be a good place to ask a few questions of the amateur astronomers, but do keep in mind that Morehead staff and telescope operators may not have time to answer extensive questions from any one person. For more personal help, attend a “telescope tune-up clinic” hosted by the Raleigh Astronomy Club. Other advice related to choosing and using telescopes can be found in this blog post.

What about accessibility?

Skywatching sessions are in outdoor locations with varying terrain and darkness. If you have special accessibility needs, please contact Morehead ahead of time with your questions.

How can I prepare for what I’m going to see at the skywatching session?

No need to prepare, but a great way to learn more about what’s visible in the current sky is by attending live programs at Morehead Planetarium, such as Carolina Skies (recommended for ages 8 through adults), Starry Nights (adults and teens), or Star Families (families with children ages 7 to 12). For more information, check the Morehead website at http://moreheadplanetarium.org/ or call (919) 962-1236.

What if I have a question that wasn’t answered here?

Please reply to this blog post with your question, send an email to mhplanet@unc.edu, or call (919) 962-1236.

Last revised September 21, 2012

Amy Sayle coordinates Morehead’s skywatching sessions at Jordan Lake.

On June 5, 2012, witness the black silhouette of Venus slowly gliding in front of the Sun.

On June 5, 2012, witness the black silhouette of Venus slowly gliding in front of the Sun.

My all-time favorite case of “impossible astronomy” happens in the final scene of Dan Brown’s popular novel The Da Vinci Code.

First, Brown invents a new moon that rises soon after sunset. (New moons actually rise at sunrise.) Then, that new moon—which by definition wouldn’t be lit on the side facing Earth—somehow bathes a character in moonlight (“her face was beautiful in the moonlight”).

Brown also tampers rather dramatically with Venus, flinging the planet right out of its orbit! See if you can spot the scientific impossibility in this excerpt from his novel, in which the character Robert Langdon makes this observation:

The stars were just now appearing, but to the east, a single point of light glowed brighter than any other. Langdon smiled when he saw it. It was Venus.

Consider the time: Since “the stars were just now appearing,” it must be early evening. The Sun has recently set. And Langdon sees Venus in the east.

But if it’s shortly after sunset and Venus is in the sky, the planet has to be more or less in the west, the same direction where the Sun set.

That’s because Venus can only appear near the Sun in our sky. Venus orbits closer to the Sun than Earth does. So from our point of view, Venus appears to travel back and forth from one side of the Sun to the other, never straying too far from the part of the sky where we see the Sun.

Therefore, if you see Venus as an “evening star,” Venus must be in the west. If you see it as a “morning star,” it must be in the east.

For months, Venus has been shining brilliantly in the western evening sky, until recently, when it vanished into the solar glare. Later this month (June 2012), Venus will re-appear on the other side of the Sun, in the eastern morning twilight.

In the meantime, though, something unusual happens: On its way to becoming a “morning star” Venus will pass directly in front of—it will transit—the Sun on Tuesday, June 5, 2012. Over about six hours, the planet will look like a black dot gliding across the face of the Sun.

If Venus and Earth orbited the Sun in exactly the same plane, these transits would be common. But because the two planets’ orbits are inclined relative to one another, a transit of Venus is a rare event, one that occurs in 8-year pairs separated by more than a century. Since we just had one in 2004, this June 5th is your last chance ever to see a Venus transit. That is, unless you’re planning on still being around for the next transit on December 10, 2117, or perhaps moving to somewhere else in the solar system.

Morehead Planetarium and Science Center will host a viewing of this rare, historic event. (Important note: To view the transit of Venus directly, you MUST protect your eyes at all times with proper solar filters, properly used.)

Our special family science event for the Transit of Venus happens at our building, 250 East Franklin Street, Chapel Hill. On Tuesday, June 5, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., you can:

  • Safely view the transit with solar telescopes and “eclipse glasses” (weather permitting, else we’ll watch via the internet).
  • See a live planetarium show in our fulldome theater. Learn how Venus transits helped us measure the size of the solar system and how astronomers use the transit method to find exoplanets.
  • Tour the Morehead Observatory.
  • Learn about the Sun and Venus from NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassadors.
  • Participate in family-friendly hands-on activities: make a sundial, experiment with “sun beads,” design a sun mask, make a planet, hunt for exoplanets, and more.

Most activities are not weather dependent, so this event (which is FREE, by the way) happens rain or shine. Please join us!

Don't miss this! Your next chance to view a transit of Venus from North Carolina won’t be until 2125.

On June 5, 2012, Venus will look like a black dot that slowly moves across the Sun.

Thanks to the gloomy weather forecast, we have canceled the skywatching session scheduled at Jordan Lake for Saturday, April 21, 2012. Our next Jordan Lake skywatching session is set for Saturday, June 23 (again, weather permitting).

In the meantime, please mark your calendars for a big event on June 5. Venus will cross in front of (“transit”) the Sun—the last chance of our lifetimes to see a Transit of Venus!

From 5:30-8:30 p.m. on Tuesday, June 5, 2012, we’ll celebrate this rare astronomical event at the Morehead Planetarium building with hands-on educational activities, safe solar viewing, tours of Morehead Observatory, live mini-shows in the planetarium dome, and science talks. FREE. And this event happens rain or shine (we’ll watch the transit via internet if we have to). Please make plans to join us!

The next transit of Venus doesn’t happen until December 11, 2117.

05 Mar 2012

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By Stephanie Baber

It’s that time of year again — time to choose summer camp experiences for your children. And if you work in the Research Triangle Park, you have a new summer camp option for your children of RTP workers.

Morehead Planetarium and Science Center is expanding its popular science camps to a new RTP site at Kestrel Heights Charter School. Morehead Summer Science Camps provide a fun and educational way for children to spend their summer, with hands-on learning activities, science-themed crafts and outdoor recreation.

The new RTP site is conveniently located near the intersection of N.C. 54 and N.C. 55, perfect for busy parents who work in Research Triangle Park. Morehead offers one-week, full-day sessions from July 9 through Aug. 3, with drop-off beginning as early as 7:45 a.m. and pick-up continuing through 5:30 p.m.

Each camp session pairs a morning theme with a afternoon theme:

  • Grades K-1

    “Dinosaur Detectives” and “Magic Tree House Explorers”

    “Aquatic Addresses” and “Bodies in Motion”
  • Grades 2-3

    “Cricket Coding” and “Me and My Shadow”

    “Secret Formulas” and “Magic Tree House Researchers”
  • Grades 4-5

    “Fizz! Bang! Boom!” and “Test Pilots”

    “LEGO Lab” and “Sky Searchers”
  • Grades 6-8

    “Rocket Science” and “Moon, Mars and Beyond”

    “Astronomical Wonders” and “LEGO” Lab Challenge”

Morehead Summer Science Camps present science to kids in new and exciting ways. Camp curricula are developed by science educators at Morehead and presented by camp counselors who are science and education majors at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Registration for these camps is open now through Morehead’s website. And if you’re a Morehead member, you’re eligible for a $30 discount on each camp session.

And if you don’t work in RTP? Morehead still offers a full summer of its “kid-tested, parent-approved” one-week, half-day camps at its original site on the UNC campus.

Stephanie Baber is a junior in UNC's School of Journalism and Mass Communications and a public relations intern with Morehead's marketing department.

Have you explored the Rotunda of Morehead Planetarium and Science Center? It’s on the west end, adjacent to the Science Stage, and you enter through the UNC Visitors Center. The Rotunda showcases one of John Motley Morehead III’s gifts to UNC, a memorial to his wife: the Genevieve Margaret Birkhead Morehead Art Gallery.

The gallery features 11 portraits, mostly by 17th- and 18th century artists. Of these, perhaps the portrait of Liesbeth van Rijn is most famous — not because of what it is, but because of what it isn’t.

Portrait of Leisbeth van Rijn

Liesbeth van Rijn

Liesbeth (or Lijsbeth, following the Dutch spelling) van Rijn was a sister and a favorite model of master painter Rembrandt van Rijn. For hundreds of years, the Liesbeth painting at Morehead was considered to be an original Rembrandt portrait. It was purchased and displayed as a Rembrandt, not only in the Morehead gallery (where it arrived in 1949) but at galleries and in private collections beginning in the 1700s.

About 30 years ago, the Rembrandt Research Project identified Liesbeth as the work of another painter in Rembrandt’s workshop, probably his student Isaac de Jouderville. With her newfound notoriety as a faux Rembrandt, Liesbeth has earned quite a bit of publicity for herself, and this month she travels to the North Carolina Museum of Art to participate in a groundbreaking exhibit of paintings by Rembrandt and other artists in his workshop. You can read about Liesbeth’s road trip in this recent article from The News & Observer.

Beginning in a few weeks, you can view Liesbeth in Raleigh at the NCMA’s Rembrandt exhibit, or you can wait until she returns home in a few months and see her in the gallery here at Morehead. Be sure to check out her “neighbors” in Morehead’s gallery:

  • Capt. David Birrell, painted by Sir Henry Raeburn
  • Lord Mountjoy Blount, painted by Sir Anthony van Dyck
  • John A. M. Bonar, painted by Sir Henry Raeburn
  • Genevieve Morehead, painted by Nichola Michailow
  • Edmund M. Pleydell, painted by Thomas Gainsborough
  • The Scribe, painted by Aart de Gelder
  • Paulus van Beresteyn, painted by Michiel Jans Mierevelt
  • Gen. George Washington, painted by Rembrandt Peele
  • Martha Washington, painted by Rembrandt Peele
  • James Watt, painted by Sir William Beechey

In addition to these portraits, the Genevieve Margaret Birkhead Morehead Art Gallery features a larger-than-life statue of U.S. President James K. Polk, who was graduated from UNC in 1818. The statue was created by artist and UNC alumnus Stephen H. Smith in 1997. The gallery also houses a unique pendulum clock and barometer, both decorated with sculpted images from the constellations of the Zodiac.

And the origin of Liesbeth isn’t the only mystery that’s been solved in the gallery. There are 16 columns supporting the Rotunda, each carved from a single piece of green marble from the Ozark Mountains. One of these monolithic columns was cracked around its circumference when the columns were installed during construction. Can you spot which column was cracked?

Yes, we're the science specialists, but we like art too.

We’re pleased to announce that the August Science Café will focus on the science of running. Join us on Thursday, August 4th, 6 p.m. at the Back Bar in downtown Chapel Hill.

The program is free and open to the public. Free appetizers courtesy of Sigma Xi, our gracious sponsor, will be available starting at 5:45 p.m.

More details:

Barefoot or Traditional? The Runner’s Dilemma

What’s better for you? A traditional running shoe with lots of support and cushioning? Or a more minimalist approach, through either very nonsupportive shoes or barefoot running? As physical therapists and UNC researchers studying different running styles, Don Goss and Dr. Mike Gross and share insights from the scientists’ point of view.

Want to take the scientists’ running style survey? Here’s the link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/JGQN2F2.

Featuring:

Don Goss, PT, lead investigator, doctoral student in biomechanics

Dr. Michael Gross, PT, FAPTA

Thursday, Aug. 4, 6 p.m.

Back Bar at Top of the Hill

Downtown Chapel Hill

Free Appetizers courtesy of Sigma Xi (while supplies last…)

Thanks! We hope to see you there,

Jonathan

Link to our page: http://moreheadplanetarium.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=page&filename=current_science_forums.html

Jonathan Frederick works with the North Carolina Science Festival and he just bought new running shoes.

The Beehive Cluster [Atlas Image courtesy of 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF

Please “catch the buzz” and join us this Saturday, June 25, when Morehead hosts a Family Science Day with a theme of “Native Pollinators.”

We will have lots of free activities!  Play Pollination Jeopardy, dance like a bee, craft a pollinator or flower, listen to a story, examine a flower with a ‘Scope on a Rope, do a scavenger hunt in Coker Arboretum, see “Science 360: Flower Power,” and have your face painted with a flower or pollinator.

Also, with paid admission to a regular planetarium program this Saturday (Morehead members free), you get a bonus: the award-winning shortJeepers Creepers” and a pollination-related tour of the night sky.

Family Science Day happens rain or shine.  Events are inside and outside the Morehead Planetarium building from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Amy Sayle will tell the Cherokee Legend of the Milky Way (a story about a wind-pollinated food) during Family Science Day.

July's Science Cafe Speaker

Meet Myron Cohen, M.D., our special guest for July’s Carolina Science Cafe. He’s a busy man, so we’re grateful he took a few minutes out of his day to answer our questions.

Where did you grow up? Chicago

What did you want to be when you were a kid? A journalist

How did you get interested in science? After serving as editor of the high school paper, I started at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana wanting to study journalism.  My first year of college, a very good friend became ill and later died.  I spent a lot of time with him at the hospital, and I guess that’s how I first became interested in medicine and decided to study pre-med.  When I took organic chemistry, not only did I absolutely love it, but I was really, really good at it, and that helped me realize that I was on the right path.

In one sentence, describe your job: I’m a catalyst for synergy among biomedical faculty at UNC.

What’s a special talent/trick/skill/hobby you have that you’re colleagues don’t know about? Well, let’s see.  I can’t sing.  I can’t dance.  I can’t type.  I’m a pretty good skier.

If someone wrote you a blank check to explore any aspect of your field’s research, what would you want to do and why? Redouble our efforts to cure HIV disease.  We’re pretty far along as it is.

Thanks, Dr. Cohen. That’s good stuff. You can read more about Dr. Cohen’s efforts here.

Please join us on Thursday, July 7, at 6 p.m. (NOTE THE NEW TIME!) for this special science cafe:

The Beginning (and End?) of the AIDS Pandemic: A 30-Year Journey

Back Bar at Top of the Hill

Downtown Chapel Hill

Sponsored by Sigma XI

Jonathan Frederick is the director of the North Carolina Science Festival. He likes mango popsicles.

Looks safe, but is it?

You’re invited to this free program: Swimming & Your Genes, starring Dr. David DeMarini, genetic toxicologist with the EPA. As summer approaches, we’re going to be discussing David’s research into swimming pools and drinking water.

In preparation, David was kind enough to share a little bit about himself.

Where did you grow up? Peoria, Illinois (yes, I played in Peoria). My father, Santa, ran a bar (I grew up in a tavern), and he was a first-generation Italian immigrant with only an 8th grade education.  My mom was a nurse (Irish from Iowa); it was a fun mix of cultures–we ate spaghetti with potatoes.  There are 4 boys, and 3 of us went into the health sciences (2 Ph.D. geneticists and 1 M.D. pulmonologist).

What did you want to be when you were a kid? A performer–anything would have been fine–singer, dancer, actor, musician (I’ve co-founded 2 theater companies, acted in a bunch of plays, and play piano–second-rate pop/B-way, and jazz).  My science career ended up satisfying my urge/need to perform–with lots of world-wide invitations to speak and lecture–combining my love of science and my desire to entertain.

How did you get interested in science? I always was curious about how the world worked, and science seemed to provide the most satisfying explanations to me; and I was pretty good at science in school. However, the “magic moment” came during my last semester of my senior year of college when I took genetics (from the finest teacher of my life), and I was hooked–I found my muse and my bliss–environmental mutagenesis, which has become a nearly 40-year love affair.  (I ended up doing my M.S. and Ph.D. under that remarkable genetics teacher–Herman Brockman at Illinois State University.)

In one sentence, describe your job: I examine the air, water, soil, food, urine from people, etc. for mutagenic activity and try to determine the types of mutations such substances induce and how those mutations might cause human disease such as cancer.

What’s a special talent/trick/skill/hobby you have that your colleagues don’t know about? I learned to make “cappelletti in brodo” as a kid from my Italian grandmother (la mia nona).  It is a pasta stuffed with chicken, beef, cheese, and lemon zest that is cooked in a beef/chicken broth–peculiar to the region east of Firenze (Florence) where my family is from.  I make a huge batch every winter that lasts for 6 months (thank heavens for freezers), but I have never shared this delicacy with either friends or colleagues–it’s only for “la famiglia.”

If someone wrote you a blank check to explore any aspect of your field’s research, what would you want to do and why? I would incorporate mutagenesis testing of the air and water in this country to go along with the chemical monitoring of air and water that currently occurs in order for us to know how mutagenic and thus, potentially carcinogenic, our air and water really are–based on actual toxicology measurements.

Great answers, David. We’ll see you on Thursday. Please bring some “cappelletti in brodo.”

We hope to see all of you at the Back Bar in downtown Chapel Hill by 7pm. Remember to get there early for some delicious appetizers sponsored by Sigma Xi.

Thanks, Jonathan

Jonathan Frederick is director of the North Carolina Science Festival. He's ready for someone to invent teleportation.