It is officially autumn, and here in North Carolina that means fresh tomatoes, cucumbers, grapes, squash, and, of course, pumpkins will be on display at farmers’ markets across the state. All of these fall treats, along with nearly all the other fruits and vegetables we eat, come from flowering plants.

Luckily for those of us who enjoy fresh produce, flowering plants are some of the most evolutionarily successful organisms on Earth – but their success does not come from luck. Instead, flowering plants have developed survival mechanisms that are almost as varied as their beautiful blossoms: from the color, size, and shape of their petals to their scents or pollen size, these plants are carefully designed to maximize their reproductive success through pollination.

Hornet

This rare orchid produces a chemical that mimics a distressed honeybee. Picture from UK Daily Mail.

Scientists in Germany have recently discovered that one flowering plant – a particular type of orchid – is trickier than most when it comes to ensuring its pollination. Scientists noticed that hornets displayed strange behavior around this flower – they would pounce on the center of the blossoms, as if attacking them. The researchers knew that the hornets typically prey on honeybees, and they discovered that the orchid actually produces the same pheromone released by honeybees as a distress call. The hornets pick up the scent and attack the flower expecting a juicy snack; instead, they unwittingly spread the orchid’s pollen!

This orchid is only one example of the diverse and creative world of flowering plants. To learn more about these incredible organisms, you can attend the Science 360 program “Flower Power,” where MPSC educators will share much more about the flowering plants around you.

Casey Rawson is the Science Content Developer for Science 360.



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