For the past year, Morehead’s been working with an Artist in Residence, David Colagiovanni, who has been not only creating new content for the dome, but thinking more in-depth about how we use and interact in the dome environment. David’s a professor in the UNC-Chapel Hill Art Department and we’ve stolen him away to work on dome stuff in his free time.

Last month, he presented his work on the dome to a packed house and we’ve convinced him to stick around for another year and push some of his ideas even further. Meanwhile, we asked one of our multimedia students, Colby Ramsay, to put together a short documentary about David and his work on the dome. And for all you gear heads, yes, he’s using the RED Camera. Check it out:

Jay Heinz is Morehead's Digital Production Manager. He wants to use the RED camera, too.

Evening planets on May 24, 2010

Three planets are visible in the current evening sky: Venus, Mars, and Saturn.

But how do you tell a planet from a star?

1)      By how it looks.

Whereas stars twinkle, planets generally shine more steadily. Planets can also look very bright—especially Venus. Currently in the western evening sky, it’s the brightest object other than the Moon. Also in the evening sky are Mars and Saturn, which are roughly as bright as the brightest stars appearing near them.

2)      By where it is.

Stars appear all over the sky, but you won’t find planets just anywhere. Because they orbit the Sun in roughly the same plane, planets always appear within a certain band in our sky—the zodiac. Right now Venus appears to be near the feet of the Gemini Twins, Mars is about to munched on by Leo the Lion, and Saturn looks like Virgo the Maiden’s earring. (Side note: Many people are familiar with the 12 astrological signs of the zodiac, but there are more than 12 astronomical constellations of the zodiac that planets can appear in. Mercury, for example, was recently hanging out inside the boundary of Cetus the Sea Monster.)

3)      By how it moves over time.

Watch a planet night after night, and eventually you’ll notice it appears to wander against the background of the stars. Learn to identify the zodiacal constellations, and then you’ll know that any “extra” star is probably a planet. For an animation of the changing positions of the planets over the next few weeks, view the May 15th Carolina Skies segment on WRAL.

Over the next few months Venus, Mars, and Saturn will appear to close in on one another. See their progress at Morehead Planetarium and Science Center’s next skywatching session on Saturday, June 19. Weather permitting, we’ll be at Jordan Lake’s Ebenezer Church Recreation Area from 9 to 11 p.m.

Amy Sayle is Morehead's Science 360 manager.

Certified Genetic Counselor Patricia Devers presented Morehead’s Current Science Forum in May.

What if you could decide what traits you want in your baby – a certain eye color, hair color, even intelligence level?

At Morehead’s Current Science Forum on May 6, reproductive genetic counselor Patricia Devers explained that because of the complexity of non-medical traits, we’re nowhere close to being capable of designing babies in the way you might select the options you want in your next car.

However, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) can currently be used to screen embryos with certain diseases or conditions. (PGD can be done on embryos created by in vitro fertilization; PGD differs from prenatal testing, which can be done only after a woman is already pregnant.)

At the Current Science Forum, Devers posed a series of ethical questions to the audience, including:

  • Should a woman who is a carrier for the sex-linked disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy be allowed to use PGD to avoid the birth of a boy who, because of his sex, would have a 50% chance of having the disease?
  • What about a couple who wants to use PGD to avoid the birth of a boy because they already have four boys and really want a girl?
  • Should a couple be allowed to use PGD to have a child with slow twitch muscles, so that the child may be better equipped to run marathons?

Although many countries regulate the use of PGD, no laws in the United States cover its use. Instead, these questions are being answered in this country by couples and their physicians.

To join in on additional thought-provoking discussions of current scientific issues, please come to Morehead’s next Current Science Forum.

Amy Sayle is Morehead's Science 360 manager.

F5 Tornado

Scientists working on the VORTEX2 project this month are combing the Great Plains in search of tornadoes. When completed in June, VORTEX2 will be the largest-ever study of tornadoes. Image by Justin Hobson.

Lightning flashes overhead, hail pounds mercilessly into the ground, and high winds threaten to bring down trees. Suddenly, a funnel cloud begins to snake down from the dark clouds above, kicking up dust and growing in size as it reaches the ground. If you are like most people, seeing something like this would probably make you want to run for cover. But for more than 100 scientists working with the VORTEX2 project, running for cover isn’t an option. Being up close and personal with tornadoes is their job, and over the course of the next month they will be patrolling the Great Plains region of the United States searching for these killer storms.

VORTEX stands for “Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment.” As the name suggests, the project is attempting to discover exactly how, when, where, and why tornadoes form. Currently, weather forecasters can predict tornadoes with an average lead time of only 13 minutes, and 70% of tornado alerts turn out to be false alarms. VORTEX2, which runs from May 1 to June 15 of this year, will be the largest-ever tornado study, and the scientists involved hope to deploy an unprecedented array of cutting-edge technology into and around these storms.

The original VORTEX project took place in 1994 and 1995 and helped to inspire the 1996 film Twister. Data from that project helped to significantly improve tornado forecasting. The VORTEX2 project will build on the knowledge gained from its predecessor by using more advanced data collection tools and by extending the study period by two weeks. You can follow VORTEX2’s daily progress at the project website or blog.

If you are interested in learning more about tornadoes and other severe weather events, stay tuned to the Morehead website for information about a new live show that will debut on June 15 (the last day of the VORTEX2 project): “Science 360: Predicting Severe Weather.”

Casey Rawson is the Science Content Developer for Science 360.