I just got the go-ahead to share a secret I’ve been dying to
tell for quite a while: Morehead Planetarium and Science Center has just started production of a fulldome planetarium show based on the popular
children’s book “Grossology and You!”

Many children and teachers are already familiar with the
“Grossology” book series
–- I know I used these books in my classroom. The concept is brilliant. The books’ author, Sylvia Branzei-Velasquez, a teacher
herself, takes all the gross stuff that kids just love — snot, blood, poop and
more –- and turns them into teachable moments. For example, scrapes and scabs become an opportunity to teach about how the body fights infection. Snot becomes an opportunity to introduce the vital role of mucus in our lungs and throughout our bodies. Jack Keely’s fun illustrations keep it all from getting too gross for anyone.

We’ve been wanting to do a human body and health planetarium show for
quite a while, and this project just seemed like the right opportunity at the
right time. With the change in our planetarium technology to fulldome digital,
the opportunity to branch out beyond astronomy and space science is now
possible. In fact, with fulldome technology we can use the dome to immerse
people in any environment that has some space to it.

Expect that the new show will involve some travel inside human body organs. This gives new meaning to “learning from the inside out!”

This project is made possible through generous support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) SEPA (Science Education
Partnership Award) program
. NIH has long been a supporter of innovative science education programs.

We will be working with Sylvia, Jack and several others to produce this show. UNC researchers Dr. Rich Superfine, Dr. Kay Lund, Dr. Alisa Wolberg, Dr. Ric Boucher and Dr. Sam Lai will provide scientific oversight. Educators from North Carolina and beyond will help ensure that the show and curriculum
materials we develop will really appeal to students and align to national
curriculum standards. And, of course, our award-winning production department
will bring it all together to create a one-of-a-kind educational experience!

Several of the other educational shows we’ve produced,
including Earth, Moon and Sun, Magic Tree House Space Mission and Solar System
Odyssey
, have been leased by planetariums throughout the US and around the
world. Grossology and You is sure to be another favorite. We look forward to
sharing it with you in early 2014.

Denise Young is Morehead’s director of education and planning.

Festival coordinator, Julie Rhodes, sharing exciting news with the rest of the planning team.

As you can imagine, things are pretty hectic around here as we count down to the start of the NC Science Festival.   It’s LESS THAN ONE MONTH AWAY!  And, while it’s hectic, it’s also so much fun.  I’ve done things (have tea with a Nobel Laureate; call Adam & Jamie to invite them to NC) and said things (“Can you park your NASCAR car here?” and “Do you mind if we chunk pumpkins through the center of campus?”) that I NEVER would have had the opportunity to say and do without the Festival.  So, thanks to everyone for enriching my life over these last few months.

And, that’s the whole point of the Festival – to enrich YOUR life by getting you involved in science, technology, math and engineering.  We are putting finishing touches on many things – including schedules and maps – so you’ll know when and where to show up for some awesome science action!  Take a look at the Festival schedule to see what I mean.  There are over 300 events taking place across the state between Sept. 11-26.

We want to invite you to attend as many events as possible during the Festival.  And we would love to see you in Chapel Hill on Sat., Sept. 25 for the UNC Science Expo.  There are literally hundreds of cool things taking place this day – demos, lab tours, talks, performances.  You name it – we’ve probably got it!

I look forward to hearing about your science adventures in September!

Denise

Denise Young is Morehead’s director of education and planning and co-founder of the NC Science Festival. She proposes skipping the rest of August so we can get on with the Festival!

A recent Bioblitz, in which over 100 citizens worked with scientists to identify species at Mason Farm Biological Reserve in central North Carolina.

Perhaps you’ve attended an art festival before.  Or a movie fest.  Or a Greek fest.  Or a beer fest.  But have you ever attended a science festival?  If that thought appeals to you, then 2010 is your year!

Morehead is coordinating the first ever North Carolina Science Festival to be held this Sept. 11 – Sept. 26.  The goal of the Festival is quite simple – to engage more North Carolinians in science.  We’ll do this by highlighting hands-on activities, science talks, exhibits, nature experiences, lab tours and other science-related activities taking place across the state.  Whether you’re a kid or an adult, it’s going to be lots of fun.

Please check the North Carolina Science Festival web site regularly for updates.  If you have a cool idea for the Festival, please let me or Julie Rhodes, Festival coordinator, know.

And if the North Carolina Science Festival leaves you wanting more, join Morehead staff – and about a million other people (literally!) – on the National Mall in DC for the USA Science and Engineering Festival Expo from Oct. 23-24.  Morehead is an official partner of this event.

Go science!

Denise Young is Morehead’s director of education and planning. She’s never met a festival she didn’t like.

math imageThere’s something for you and every member of your family at Saturday’s Family Math Game Fest.  Become a life-size game piece on a chess board.  Compete in the triMATHlon.  Construct a house of cards.  Catch a special showing of Flatland.  Investigate lasers.  Build a network.  Simulate the spread of a virus.  Find math in nature…  Doesn’t this sound like fun?

There will many, many activities that will inspire you to think about math – and the connections between math and science – in new ways.

This free event will be held from 11am-3pm.  We’ll have activities for all ages throughout the building.

A special thanks to Chris, Becca, Emily and the UNC Math Club and UNC Women in Mathematics members for supporting this event.

Please join us!

Denise

Denise Young is Morehead’s director of education and planning. She's been training for the triMATHlon for weeks - so watch out!

caiusIf you’ve ever visited Morehead, you’ve learned something new about science and the world in which we live.

What may be less obvious is that Morehead is a rich learning ground for UNC students, too.  There have always been student employees at Morehead.  However, in 2001, the organization made a bold and purposeful decision to strengthen the experience for student employees by aligning its staffing strategy to the academic mission of the University.  Now, over sixty UNC students work at Morehead, and they take center stage in our organization. It is the job of our full-time staff to mentor, nurture and support them as they learn skills related to teaching, nonprofit management and communications.

Students can be found in every aspect of our operations.  In addition to serving as the “public face” of the organization – giving shows, teaching in our programs and selling tickets and merchandise in our gift shop – students work behind the scenes designing curriculum, writing for our publications and planning events.  They learn to communicate complex ideas, manage projects and reflect on their successes (and occasional failures).

In addition, many of our more experienced student employees train and support their newer colleagues.  For example, Mallory and Eryn held a training session over the weekend for our exhibit facilitators.  They planned the agenda, prepared the materials and presented the information to our staff. They will then follow up with their colleagues, answering their questions and providing additional support.  This is just one example of a leadership role available to student employees through our organization.

For sixty years, Morehead has provided high quality science education to more than seven million people – schoolchildren, teachers, families and others. Now we’re also preparing the next generation of science educators, communicators and business people, too.  We are a learning organization through and through.

Denise Young is Morehead’s director of education and planning.

When I was a young girl, I remember rationing the pages of the last book in the Laura Ingalls Wilder series. I read only five pages a day because I just didn’t want that story to end! Unfortunately, it did end, but the story of Laura Ingalls Wilder started and sealed my passion for adventure stories – a passion that continues to this day. From this experience, I also learned about the power of a good story to engage, inspire, motivate and educate. My colleagues and I often talk about “the power of the story” and aim to share science through stories in our programs, exhibits and shows.

An obvious example is Magic Tree House Space Mission, our planetarium show based on the popular book series by Mary Pope Osborne. In this original story, Jack and Annie go on wondrous adventures – to an observatory, a Moon colony and even a black hole – as they try to complete a task for the mysterious “M.” We, as audience members, travel with them and learn about stars, the Moon and space travel along the way.

Similarly, we integrate myths and legends of the night sky in our live Carolina Skies programs. And Morehead programs like Meet-A-Scientist and Current Science Forum offer firsthand accounts of UNC scientists’ quests to understand our world better. In addition to sharing their research findings, the scientists treat us to behind-the-scenes stories.

Why the emphasis on story in our science education programs? Many reasons. First, good stories are captivating. They are powerful hooks for learning. They capture our minds and our hearts. And, once minds and hearts are opened, our ability to learn science is a snap!

Good stories can also provide context – making something difficult, foreign, scary or dry feel accessible and doable and exciting and real. For example, in our DESTINY curriculum module called Brand Name Genes, rather than giving the textbook lesson about genetics and heredity, our educators developed a scenario whereby the participating students must role-play insurance company employees who are deciding whether or not to provide coverage to particular clients, some who may have the BRCA 1 and 2 genes. Of course, the high school students involved in the role-play must learn about genetics and heredity, but they do so for a purpose and in a context which may have some familiarity for them.

And, a really good story leaves us wanting more – just like my experience with the Laura Ingalls Wilder series. Our staff hopes that sharing science through stories inspires our visitors to become more interested in science, both while at Morehead and after going home.

So, what’s your favorite science story? Feel free to share it here. And, if you’re looking for a good source for high-quality science books for children (and adults who love them!), try Esme Raji Codell’s web site, PlanetEsme.com. Ms. Codell is an award-winning educator and an advocate for sharing excellent stories with children. Fiction and non-fiction science stories are regularly featured on her blog.

Happy reading!

Denise

Denise Young is Morehead’s director of education and planning. She is currently reading Nerds: Who They Are and Why We Need More of Them and Grossology.